Music Video #1 “Are You Sure Joe?” by Cine City (circa 1996)

This was a film shot on Saddleworth moor around 1995/96 by Andrew Gough on Super 8 – rough and ready. Soundtracks is ace – our first music video – eeeeek

Soundersons Go Italo

We grew up in Bologna, one hour’s drive from Rimini which was the capital of dance music in the late 80s and 90s. The vibe was amazing; music, parties and fashion people from all over the world looking for inspiration. We didn’t know that other places weren’t the same, but we were on par with London, New York, you name it! It was second nature for us.
Italo Disco and Italo House represented us; the attitude, the happy feeling, the over the top Italian pride, the typical Italian way of doing something good with minimum resources. We used to drive to Riccione on Saturdays and as soon as you got off the highway there was a parking lot where DJs from all over Europe would exchange and sell records, a bit of a real life discogs. You’d drive home, put the needle on and get inspired. The people who did this are funky, we groove a little bit more than others because we breathed that music.
A lot of those Italo records where recorded at Fonoprint by Celso Valli and Maurizo Biancani. The studio was in the centre of town and you’d meet them at 4 in the bar round the corner. We listened to their stories and if you where lucky you could have a preview in the car. We weren’t that lucky, but we were there!

Get the Soundersons new 12″ Respect The Funk on Bandcamp and in all good record shops.

Here are our top Italo records.

Alexander Robtnik – Problemes D’Amour

Gaz Nevada – I.C. Love Affair

2AKano – Can’t Hold You Back

Jimmy Ross – First True Love Affair

Tullio De Piscopo – Stop Bajon

Daco vs Quincy Jones – Free Download

The mighty Daco has taken Quincy Jones to the workshop and reworked him in to a smocking track of big band fire that has been mastered for you to have and to hold.
Keep the peace, it’s getting rocky out there!

 

Rachel Johns – Special Edition Stubb 12″

Rachel Johns’ describes how she created the artwork for the record sleeve:

“Listening to the Stubb track I was inspired to draw the images for the record sleeve. My process is to draw with a stick & ink on textured paper to create a final drawing.
The next part was a collaboration with Amy Mellis & The Egg Factory as Amy designed the colourful labels for the records. We then went on to screen print the two images on either side of the card sleeve here at The Egg Factory.
For a very special limited edition of 20 I made screen printed fabric sleeves using the main image & free machine stitched into the background of each one with red thread. I often stitch into the background of my original drawings as I love the unexpected quality of drawing with a sewing machine onto paper- I thought it would make a special edition to actually stitch onto the fabric sleeves!”

Buy it in the Paper Shop

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‘Love Not Sex’ by Stubb – Teaser Video

The brand new single from Stubb is out in mid-October with mixes from Mori Ra and Leca Lecara.
Get your pre-sale HERE

 

 

 

 

The Wild Army Q & A

We asked the mercenaries and outlaws of The Wild Army a few questions.

If you had to join an army, which one would it be?

Mr. Tea – The Army of Dreamers (ask Kate Bush).
Benjamin Eh (Ben Arnold) – The Salvation Army.
Leca Lecara – Wild Army.
Leon Sweet – Vinyl Rotator & Button Flicker – Rebel Alliance Special Forces, with Chewy by my side.

What’s the wildest night you’ve ever had out?

Mr Tea – A night that ended with an orgy with the entire cast and crew of Lord Of The Rings still in costume.
Benjamin Eh – A night out with the Salvation Army at Amnesia, 1983. I still have the trombone burns.
Leca – Must be some of them good old rave nights back in the days. Used to go proper out of hands.
Leon Sweet – Ha! I’ll save that for my memoirs 

Favourite monster flick?

Mr Tea – The Thing. Easily.
Benjamin Eh – Jaws II.
Leca – Godzilla. Insane special effects!
Leon Sweet – Jaws, that dead dude in the bottom of the boat made me jump so fuckin’ hard I kneed myself in the face and cut my lip watching that film as a kid.

What bit of studio gear are you currently rocking the hardest at the moment?

Mr Tea – I just picked up a rare Soviet Synthesizer called the Opus. Pics to come.
Benjamin Eh – The Korg Minilogue.
Leca – Riding my beloved Elektron Trinity rack, Octa, Rytm & A-4.
Leon Sweet – Maschine Studio, Fifth Mode was produced entirely on it.

 

 

HEAR THE WILD ARMY VOL 1 HERE

 

 

Flash Atkin’s Studio gets investigated in Attack Mag

“It’s like a glorified scout hut with cows right outside my window.” Ben Davis shows us around his studio in the West Yorkshire countryside.”

Fascinating behind the keyhole look at Ben’s studio – Warning Gear Porn Alert!

The Egg Factory

 

Ahead of Ben Davis’ Stubb 12″ we interviewed the people behind the artwork and design.

Can you tell us what The Egg Factory is all about?
The Egg Factory is a co-working space in an old egg packing plant in Hebden Bridge for creatives to create, learn and collaborate. We’ve got desks, screen printing and product photography equipment that our members can use by the day or by the month, loads of Yorkshire tea and all the chat. We do screen printing for local businesses and creatives and we sometimes have a fun event to break up the grey Yorkshire days! Today we’ve got a music journalist, a food charity worker, a novelist and someone who puts the hair into wax-work heads all using our desks.

When did you set it up and why?
The Egg Factory opened in February 2015 after much scraping of floors, gallons of white paint and many hours plotting and dreaming!
Our four founding members Amy, Katch Sue and Rachel came together as a co-operative after three years of curating pop-up shops, putting on interactive events in Hebden Bridge and enjoying being together. We wanted to work on our own creative businesses (Amy is a draw-er/printer/maker, Katch makes beautiful ceramics, Sue sews quilts and Rachel is a fine, fine artist) at the same time as doing stuff as our little collective so we looked for a space to share. When we couldn’t find anything quite right we decided to move into a massive industrial unit and share our space and resources with other people.

And where would you like it to go?
Our aim is to build a sustainable business which supports the running of the space. We want to see The Egg Factory grow as a platform for creativity, collaboration and innovation, a space where our co-workers can continue to collaborate and thrive. And of course we’re always looking for new projects and collaborations for our portfolio of unusual and weird screen printing work – the more the merrier!

How did you go about designing and making the records?
Amy – I love typography so when Ben asked me to come up with some ideas for the Stubb sticker I drew about a million different versions. I draw with a fine felt tip and then scan in my drawings and faff with them in Photoshop. I wanted the sticker to be colourful and fun, like the record.


Rachel: “I spent time in my studio listening to each track on repeat and sketching ideas as they came to me. I felt really inspired by the music so the ideas flowed naturally and freely. I found the tracks very distinctive and each one seemed to suggest a very different story or idea, which helped to form the images. It was a new way for me to work but one that I found really enjoyable.”

Amy – We did a bit of fettling on the computer to make the drawings the right size. I screen printed Rachel’s drawings onto the kraft card sleeves and we used gold foil for the limited edition fabric sleeves. We sewed and finished them here at The Egg – we love a bit of stitch action!

Can you tell us about your art in general Rachel?
Rachel: “I draw with a stick and ink and sewing machine to create characters and creatures which are often expressing my thoughts, desires, relationships or the energy of a moment. I also have a fascination with mythology and mythical creatures often make an appearance in my work. I love the freedom of working with the stick and ink and every mark I make becomes part of the final drawing. The ink I use is quite thick and my paper is slightly textured, this means that the quality of my line often has a slightly rough and raw quality which I think fits well with my expressive drawings. My favourite thing is to have a new series of drawings to work on- the larger the scale the better!

Where can people find you if they want some of your Egg Factory magic?
We’re on Victoria Road in Hebden Bridge, not too far from the station. The kettle’s always on and there’s usually biscuits so it’s always worth popping in for a look. There’s more info about us and what we do here. We’ve got some live screen printing events coming up in the summer and you can see Rachel with her stick in her hand at Hebden Bridge Open Studios in July.

Paper Radio # 21

Ben Davis hosts the latest instalment of Paper Radio with some previously unheard golden oldies, a mix from Clandestino and forthcoming releases including tracks from Trash The Wax.
So hop on board the Paper Rave Train.

1. Tumisang Pooe – I.R.S.A.N.S
2. Vainc – 2000300
3. Fever Few – Them Persians
4. Truant – Rifle Range (Live)
5. Crazy Penis – You Started Something (Instrumental Edit)
6. Daco – The Uprise (Galáctica Mix)
7. Flash Atkins & Charlie Sinclair – That Hit
8. Flash Atkins – Dark Night of The Soul
9. 2 Billion Beats – Papa (Richard Seaborne Papa’s Struggle feat. GizMo Mix)
10. Fingerman – Burnin’ Sanders
11. Kimo – Trance

CLANDESTINO MIX

12. Parkway Rhythm – The Answer (T-Kut’s Massive Dub)
13. Lauer – Hump Acid (Lexx Remix)
14. Black Spuma – No Cube
15. Les Crocodiles – La Nuit Des Tropiques (Field Of Dreams Remix)
16. Curses – Canini (Dreems Beautiful Mens Club Remix)
17. Armonics – Red Eye (Black Spuma Remix)
18. TYV – Miau! (lauer remix)

19. De Fantastiske To – Monokrom feat. OST
20. Soundersons – Make The Music
21 Marma Boog – Crazee
22. Flash Atkins – All I Want For Christmas Is You

The Northern Disco Lights Road Trip to Svalbård

SEPTEMBER 1

After three years in the making, our film Northern Disco Lights covering the birth and rise of Norwegian dance music has been released, well received, competed at film festivals, won an award, been shown on TV and is now streaming on Red Bull TV. We have just had a big show at London’s Village Underground and the promo cycle is pretty much over, except for one final road trip.

Team NDL are headed to the place that is the most northern bit of Northern Norway…with Viking horns on. In fact, it’s the northern most settlement in the world –Svalbård.

Since seeing Carl Christian Lein Størmer, Per and Aggie Martinsen’s brilliant film Ghost Radio Hunter (go seek) it’s been caught in our imaginations and we’ve been trying to get there ever since. There are more polar bears than people (approx. 3000 / 2400), it’s pitch black for 6 months of the year and has a deserted Soviet mining town. It’s as far North from Tromsø as Tromsø is from Oslo and it’s next stop, the North Pole.

After much manoeuvring, Per (Mental Overdrive) managed to arrange a trip to the island for a screening and party with Mental Overdrive live, myself (Flash Atkins) and the mighty Bjørn Torske. Pete Jenkinson (producer) is along for the trip but unfortunately, the third cog in the production team, camera wizz Terje Rafaelsen won’t be as he’s working. He’ll be missed.

It’s hard to know what to expect from the party but the first thing that comes to mind is Gruff Rhys wearing a robot head in the Patagonian outback and playing to a room full of bemused locals in in his excellent film, Separado!  We shall see.

So it’s time to practise my gun skills (everybody carries them in case of bear attacks) and stock up on vitamin D.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9

An over night stay in Tromsø where we catch up with Terje and nail the duty free. The city used to feel a long way North, not any more. Forecast for Longyearbyen, -1 and 6 metres per second wind that will make it feel like -10. Coats and snow boots are borrowed.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10

We get on the once daily flight and take off for the Arctic with additional decks, CDJs and flight cases in tow. It’s an hour and forty minutes and a very strange sensation as it gets steadily darker outside. It really does feel like we are flying into the abyss, especially when the wind picks up and things get pretty choppy. As we start to descend, the aircraft is pushed and pulled around and there is still nothing to see outside. Suddenly landing lights appear at eye height and it’s white-knuckle time. Everybody seems to be holding their breath and there’s a collective exhale as we touch the ground.

So here we are in Longyearbyen, the world’s most Northernmost settlement. We are greeted by Jan Martin Berg (our host for the weekend and the man who put it all together) and Per, and we hook up with Bjørn Torske and Nicolas Horne who’s doing the visuals. Then it’s out in to the wilderness. Town is a few kilometres away but we take a diversion to the “Doomsday” Svalbård Global Seed Vault that stores over a million packets of seeds. It is backup for the world’s other 1,750 banks in case of regional or global crises and it certainly seems like we may need it at the moment.

The rough track climbs up in to the mountain and it seems like we are on another planet, dark, barren and cold. The entrance is just a door with some kind of light installation over the top that makes it feel even more sci-fi. You know when they first get to the cave in Prometheus, like that.

Back in the car we bombard Jan-Martin with questions; how cold does it get (-25 degrees), do you really need a gun for polar bears (yes), do they come in to town (occasionally), how long between the 24 hour dark nights and sun (5 weeks, it changes 20 minutes a day), what’s the most difficult season (it depends on who you ask, but the 24 hour daylight sends people crackers). We find out that all the power comes from the last remaining coal-fired power station in Norway and the irony of it being next door to the seed bank is not lost on us.

The majority of the town is heated by water pipes still hot from cooling down the coal furnaces. It seems to be the only power solution as it’s too gusty for turbines, there is no electricity from the mainland and you can’t dig cables in to the permafrost. Everybody has to have a job and if you are ill or too old to care for yourself, you are shipped out. The main industry was mining, most of which have been shut down and the average stay for Norwegians is 6.3 years, but for foreigners (of which there are over 50 nationalities), 4.3. Everything is shipped in and nothing can grow.

But none of these statistics get over how weird it is. It really does feel like we are at the end of the world and that humans shouldn’t be here. If the power went down, things would go south very quickly.

At the hotel we dump our bags and head straight into town, which is basically one main street with a few shops, bars, diners and a small supermarket. Longyearbyen runs up the middle of a massive valley with mountains on either side. It’s cold and we’re hungry and the café we go to ticks all the stereotypical boxes; wall to wall pine, arctic photos and dead animals everywhere. We then have a look around the shops, most notably one that specialises in every hide imaginable including seal, badger, wolf, reindeer (which now looks great on my bed), brown and polar bears, which come from the Canadian Inuits who are allowed to hunt the bears. But it still seems pretty wrong. I ask if they have any under the counter dodos, they don’t…. or so they say. The polar bears could well be on the endangered list because they have all been killed and stuffed, virtually every building we go in has one, some wearing boxing gloves.

We pop in for a brew with Per’s mother-in-law, Eva Grøndal who is one of the few people to have been born here as her mother hid the pregnancy until it was too late to leave for the mainland (you’re not allowed to give birth on Svalbård). She and Per told us about how her house was destroyed in an avalanche the previous year as a result of global warming in the Arctic, due to above average snowfall.

Once evening came it felt a bit more normal to be in the dark, so we go for a dinner of reindeer (what else?) with the Tromsø KOFOR / RYK crowd and talk about how we can promote Norway in the UK on the back of the film. Then it’s on to the Svalbård Brewery bar on an industrial estate that is jumping with plenty of young beardy, outdoorsy types. When that shuts down we’re off to the Karlsberger Pub which is the local’s drinking hole. It’s going full bore and no surprises considering there are at least 350 bottle of spirits on display and a ceiling that touches your head. We promise ourselves we will go home early to save our energy for tomorrow when suddenly its 2am and last orders are called….whoops.

SATURDAY, 11 NOVEMBER

We wake late in the dark and go for breakfast in the dark, ready for a day in the dark. It constantly feels like 6pm and I can only equate it to having jetlag. There’s a trip out of town to see some huskies and with the horizontal wind rocking the car, you realize just how hostile the environment is.

Off to the sound check at the Kulturhuset and the room is a big hall with brilliant facilities. Its a bit ‘dry’ which will be great for the film, less so for the party. After all the excitement there’s time for a disco nap then over to Eva Grøndal’s gallery, just out of town. I ask Aggie if it’s safe to walk and she isn’t 100% sure as there’s a stretch of road where there are no houses to run in to if there’s a bear. Crikey. The other danger is getting knocked over by vehicles in the dark so everybody is high-vized up to the max. We cadge a lift.

Eva’s mother and father took over 14,000 photos, mainly on Svalbård. She is curating them and they are amazing, like a lost treasure trove from a by-gone era. I look forward to them get the appreciation and audience they deserve.

At dinner (seal carpaccio is on the menu…Pete steps up) we find out that something has gone wrong with the bar in the venue so we’ll have to find somewhere else. It all gets exciting for everybody except Jan-Martin who has his head in his hands as we talk cafés, rooms and sound systems. Truth be known, we are slightly disappointed when the issue gets resolved after 40 minutes and we are back in the Kulturhuset.

At the screening, it’s pretty quiet as it seems word hasn’t really got out. The film kicks off and those that are there, enjoy it. Afterwards Mental Overdrive starts things cooking with a live modular setup that drifts from ambient noodlings in to sublime techno with plenty of cuts from his new album, “Epilogue” on Prins Thomas’ Rett I Fletta label. More people have turned up and we’ve got a party on our hands as Per proceeds to rock it. He is without question one of the great un-sung heroes of Norwegian dance music.

Next, I am going B2B with Bjørn Torske, in my opinion one of the world’s best DJs and most original producers, so I’m super chuffed. The system is immense and those records that sound like they’ve got a bit of grunt at home are suddenly bloody massive. We soon get in to a groove as house gets mixed in to disco and back again: Ulfus’ Guts! – (Funky Gibbons Dub), Dele Sosimi Afrobeat Orchetra – Too Much Information (Laolu Remix Edit), Solid State – Philly Live (Rack’em Edit), DJ Click – Lila Club and finishing off with Brassroots – Good Life. High sweat manoeuvres achieved.

Party over, it’s back to the hotel bar to see the night out and we bombard the locals with questions they must have asked a hundred times before. There’s also talk of how to get back for another party so watch this space.

SUNDAY, 12 NOVEMBER

We start on the two-day trip back to Blighty feeling a bit shell shocked by the experience. It is without question one of the strangest places I have ever been. The proximity to nature and elements, climate and geography and just the isolation makes for a something very weird and wonderful.

Ben Davis

 

Hear two tracks from Mental Overdrive’s live set.